North Carolina Concealed Carry Reciprocity Map & Gun Laws

Carry allowed with my North Carolina permit?
No
Yes
Yes, Selected State(s)

Have concealed carry permits from more than one state?

Check out our new Multi-State Permit Tool here!

10.6M

STATE POPULATION

48

STATES HONORED

21

MINIMUM AGE TO CC

37

RECIPROCATING STATES

49

ATTORNEYS IN USCCA NETWORK

204

USCCA CERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS

814k

PERMITS ISSUED

7.7%

PERMIT PERCENTAGE

5

YEARS PERMIT VALID

NEED ANSWERS NOW?

There's a lot of information here, so our Customer Engagement Team is always ready to help:

Summary of North Carolina Gun Laws

North Carolina is a shall-issue state with concealed handgun permits issued at the county level by the local sheriff’s office.

Open carry is legal in North Carolina without a permit. Counties may regulate the display of firearms on public roads, sidewalks, alleys or other public property. The minimum age is 18 years old. Some areas are off-limits, including schools and the State Capitol grounds.

Concealed carry is legal for residents with a North Carolina Concealed Handgun Permit (CHP) and for non-residents with any valid license/permit. North Carolina CHP’s are issued to residents and members of the military permanently posted in North Carolina and require a firearms training course that has been approved by the state. The minimum age is 21 years old. In terms of reciprocity, North Carolina recognizes permits from all states, regardless of the age of the permit holder.

Use of Force

A person is justified in using force, except deadly force, when and to the extent that the person reasonably believes that the conduct is necessary to defend himself or herself or another against the other’s imminent use of unlawful force.

Immunity from Liability

Force which is intended or likely to cause death or bodily injury is immune from civil or criminal liability or the wrongful death of a person against whom such force was used if the use of such force was justified.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. §§ 14-51.2 and 14-51.3]

Self-Defense

North Carolina is a Castle Doctrine state and has a “stand your ground” statute.

A person is justified in the use of deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat in any place a person has the lawful right to be if he or she reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another; or if a person is in one’s home, vehicle or workplace and provided that the person against whom the defensive force was used was an unlawful intruder or was attempting to forcibly and unlawfully enter.

Use of Deadly Force

However, a person is justified in the use of deadly force and does not have a duty to retreat in any place he or she has the lawful right to be if either of the following applies:

  • The person reasonably believes that such force is necessary to prevent imminent death or great bodily harm to himself or herself or another.

The lawful occupant of a home, motor vehicle or workplace is presumed to have held a reasonable fear of imminent death or serious bodily harm to himself or herself or another when using defensive force that is intended or likely to cause death or serious bodily harm to another if both of the following apply:

  • The person against whom the defensive force was used was in the process of unlawfully and forcefully entering or had unlawfully and forcibly entered a home, motor vehicle or workplace, or that person had removed or was attempting to remove another against that person’s will from the home, motor vehicle or workplace; and
  • The person who uses defensive force knew or had reason to believe that an unlawful and forcible entry or unlawful and forcible act was occurring or had occurred.

“Home” is defined as a building or conveyance of any kind, including its curtilage, whether the building or conveyance is temporary or permanent, mobile or immobile, which has a roof over it, including a tent, and is designed as a temporary or permanent residence.

Join the USCCA todayJoin the USCCA todayJoin the USCCA today

North Carolina Gun Laws at a Glance

Carry Basics
Tasers or Stun Guns?
Is it legal to own a taser or stun gun in North Carolina?

Yes. Stun guns and Tasers are legal for anyone at least 18 years old to purchase without a permit. Concealed carry is legal only on an individual’s own premises. The state also specifically prohibits carrying a stun gun on school property, or helping a minor do so.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. §§ 14-269 and 269.2]

Chemical Spray/Pepper Spray?
Is it legal to buy or use chemical spray/pepper spray in North Carolina?

Yes, possession and use of self-defense sprays is lawful for use by individuals who have not been convicted of a felony, for self-defense purposes only. No permit is required. The capacity of any tear gas device or container may not exceed 150cc. Tear gas cartridges or shells must not exceed 50cc, and tear gas devices or containers may not have the capability of discharging any cartridge, shell or container larger than 50cc.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-401.6]

MAGAZINE LIMITS FOR HANDGUNS?
Does North Carolina have magazine capacity restrictions for handguns?

No. North Carolina does not impose a maximum magazine capacity for handguns.

AMMUNITION RESTRICTIONS?
Does North Carolina have ammunition restrictions?

Yes. The possession and sale of teflon-coated bullets is prohibited.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. § 14-34.3(a)]

Constitutional Carry?
Does North Carolina allow constitutional carry?

No. North Carolina does not allow constitutional carry.

Open Carry Permitted?
Is open carry permitted in North Carolina?

Yes, without a permit. However, counties may regulate the display of firearms on public roads, sidewalks, alleys or other public property.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 160A-189] [N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 153A-129]

Gun Permit Licensure?
If North Carolina requires a permit to carry a concealed firearm, how are those permits issued?

North Carolina is a shall-issue state.

Minimum Age for Concealed Carry?
What is the minimum age in North Carolina to get a concealed carry permit?

You must be 21 to apply for a concealed carry permit in North Carolina.

Weapons Other Than Handguns Allowed?
Can you concealed carry weapons other than handguns in North Carolina with a concealed carry permit (or under permitless carry if applicable)?

No. A North Carolina CHP does not allow the concealed carry of non-handgun weapons.

Join the USCCA todayJoin the USCCA todayJoin the USCCA today
Carry Locations
CARRY AT ROADSIDE REST AREAS?
Can you carry a concealed firearm at roadside rest areas in North Carolina?

Yes. Anyone with a permit may carry at roadside rest areas in North Carolina​.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.11(c3)]

CARRY IN STATE/NATIONAL PARKS, STATE/NATIONAL FORESTS AND WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT AREAS (WMAS)?
Can you carry a concealed firearm in state/national parks, state/national forests and Wildlife Management Areas in North Carolina?

Yes, with a valid concealed carry permit, although firearms are prohibited in state park visitor centers and park offices. In addition, firearms are prohibited on lands and waters at Falls Lake, Jordan Lake and Kerr Lake state recreation areas managed by the state parks system but owned by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. See the National Parks webpage for links to each Park in North Carolina.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.11(c1) and (C3) and 36 C.F.R. § 327.13]

CARRY IN BARS/RESTAURANTS THAT SERVE ALCOHOL?
Can you carry a concealed firearm in bars and restaurants that serve alcohol in North Carolina?

Yes, with a valid concealed carry permit, unless posted and provided you do not consume any alcohol or have any alcohol in your system.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-269.3]

CARRY/POSSESS AT A HOTEL?
Can you carry or possess a firearm on hotel property in North Carolina?

It is a crime for any person to knowingly carry concealed on or about his person on any private premises where notice that carrying a concealed handgun is prohibited by the posting of a conspicuous notice or statement by the person in legal possession or control of the premises. The individual hotel should be contacted to inquire about it's concealed carry policy. See the Handguns at Hotels page for additional information.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.11(c)(8)]

CARRY IN VEHICLE?
Can you carry a concealed handgun in a vehicle in North Carolina?

Yes, with a permit. Without a permit, a weapon cannot be BOTH concealed and readily accessible to a person. Therefore a handgun would need to be either openly displayed or in a locked glove box, locked console or in the trunk. A handgun under the front seat or in an unlocked glove box or console is illegal. 

[N.C. Dept. of Public Safety FAQs]

STORE IN A VEHICLE IN AN EMPLOYEE PARKING LOT?
Does North Carolina have laws relating to storing firearms in private vehicles in an employee parking lot?

North Carolina statutes address specific employees only.

Detention personnel or correctional officers and legislators or legislative employees employed by the State or a unit of local government who park a vehicle in a space that is authorized for their use in the course of their duties may transport a firearm to the parking space and store that firearm in the vehicle parked in the parking space, provided that:

(i) the firearm is in a closed compartment or container within the locked vehicle, or (ii) the firearm is in a locked container securely affixed to the vehicle. 

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-269][N.C.Gen. Stat. Ann. § 120-32.1]

Key State Laws
Duty to Inform Officer You're Carrying?
Do you have a duty to inform a police officer that you're carrying a concealed firearm in North Carolina?

Yes. You have a duty to inform a law enforcement officer that you're carrying a concealed firearm upon initial contact.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.21]

Red Flag Law?
Does North Carolina have a red flag law?

North Carolina does not have a red flag law.

DRIVER'S LICENSE LINKED TO Carry Permit?
Is my North Carolina driver’s license linked to my North Carolina carry permit?

Yes. Your North Carolina driver’s license is linked to your North Carolina concealed handgun permit. Therefore, a law enforcement officer will be notified immediately that you are a concealed carry permit holder if they run your driver’s license.

Brandishing?
Does North Carolina state law define brandishing?

No definition of brandishing was found in North Carolina law.However, if any person shall point any gun or pistol at any person, either in fun or otherwise, whether such gun or pistol be loaded or not loaded, he shall be guilty of a crime.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-34]

A person who engages in fighting or other violent conduct or in conduct creating the threat of imminent fighting or other violence has committed the crime of disorderly conduct.

[N.C. Gen Stat. Ann. § 14-288.4]

"No Weapons Allowed" Signs Enforced?
Are "No Weapons Allowed" signs enforced in North Carolina? If yes, violating the sign would be considered to be a crime. If no, violating the sign would not be considered a criminal offense.

Yes. A permit does not authorize a person to carry a concealed handgun on any private premises that are posted prohibiting firearms.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. §§ 14-415.11 and 14-415.21]

NON-RESIDENT PERMITTING?
Does North Carolina issue concealed carry permits to non-residents?

Only for members of the military permanently posted in North Carolina.

Preemption?
Does North Carolina have preemption laws related to concealed carry (i.e. Does state law supersede local laws regarding the possession of handguns)?

Yes, the state has preemption of firearms laws in North Carolina, except a unit of local government may post recreational areas such as playgrounds, athletic facilities and swimming pools.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.23][N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-409.40]

PUBLIC ACCESS TO CONCEALED CARRY REGISTRY?
Does North Carolina allow the public to access concealed carry registry information through public records law?

No, however the information is available for law enforcement.

Carry While Using Alcohol or Controlled Substances?
Does North Carolina have laws regarding carrying a concealed firearm while using alcohol or Controlled Substances?

Not while consuming alcohol or at any time while the person has remaining in the person's body any alcohol or in the person's blood a controlled substance previously consumed, but a person does not violate this condition if a controlled substance in the person's blood was lawfully obtained and taken in therapeutically appropriate amounts or if the person is on the person's own property.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14-415.11(c2)]

As a responsibly armed American, regardless of the laws in your state, it is unwise to carry while under the influence of any substance that could impair your judgement, slow your reaction times, or impact your decision-making abilities. Any decision you make while carrying a firearm could have life-altering consequences.

Handgun Purchase & Possession
HANDGUN REGISTRATION?
Do handguns need to be registered in North Carolina?

No.

MINIMUM AGE TO POSSESS AND TRANSPORT?
What is the minimum age to possess and transport a handgun in North Carolina?

You must be 18 years old to possess or transport a handgun in North Carolina.

[N.C.Gen. Stat. Ann. § 14‐269.7]

POSSESS A HANDGUN ON MY PRIVATE PROPERTY WITHOUT A PERMIT?
Can I possess/carry a handgun in my home without a permit?

Yes. A concealed carry permit is not required for anyone legally entitled to carry a firearm to carry a handgun on the person's own premises.

[N.C. Gen. Stat. Ann. §14-269]

BACKGROUND CHECKS FOR PRIVATE GUN SALES?
Are background checks required for private gun sales in North Carolina?

No.

NORTH CAROLINA PERMIT EXEMPTS FROM BACKGROUND CHECK?
Does my current North Carolina concealed carry permit exempt me from needing a background check when I purchase a firearm?

Yes.

PURCHASE PERMITS?
Is a permit required to purchase a handgun in North Carolina?

No. On March 29, 2023, the General Assembly of North Carolina voted to override the governor's veto of SB 41. A permit to purchase is no longer required.

WAITING PERIOD?
Is there a waiting period after purchasing a handgun in North Carolina?

No.

Our rights shouldn't stop when we cross state lines. Support National Reciprocity. Take Action: Sign the Petition NowOur rights shouldn't stop when we cross state lines. Support National Reciprocity. Take Action: Sign the Petition NowOur rights shouldn't stop when we cross state lines. Support National Reciprocity. Take Action: Sign the Petition Now

Related Blog Posts

Have Questions? Contact Our Award-Winning, Wisconsin-Based Member Services Team 24/7 at 800-674-9779


STATE CONSTITUTIONAL PROVISION

A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms shall not be infringed, and, as standing armies in time of peace are dangerous to liberty, they shall not be maintained, and the military should be kept under strict subordination to and governed by the civil power. Nothing herein shall justify the practice of carrying concealed weapons, or prevent the General Assembly from enacting penal statutes against that practice." ARTICLE 1, § 30

North Carolina Concealed Carry Reciprocity With Other States

Which states' permits does North Carolina honor?

North Carolina recognizes all states concealed carry permits/licenses regardless of the age of the permit holder. Residents must have a North Carolina Concealed Handgun Permit (CHP) in order to carry in the state.


Other States' Reciprocity With North Carolina

Which states honor permits from North Carolina?

Alabama (permitless carry, at least 19 years old)

Arkansas (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Delaware

Idaho (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Indiana (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Minnesota

Montana (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Nevada

New Hampshire (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

New Mexico

North Dakota (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

South Dakota (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Vermont (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Virginia

Washington

Wisconsin

Note: Firearms must be carried in accordance with the laws of the state you are visiting. Be sure to check the laws of the other state before traveling there with your firearms.


States That Have Restricted Reciprocity with North Carolina

North Carolina offers resident and non-resident (members of the military permanently posted in North Carolina) permits. If indicated with “Resident only” below, that state only honors North Carolina resident permits (and not those issued to non-residents).

Alaska (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Arizona (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Colorado (at least 21 years old and resident permits only)

Florida (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Georgia (Permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Iowa (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Kansas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Kentucky (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Louisiana (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Maine (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Michigan (at least 21 years old and resident permits only)

Mississippi (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Missouri (permitless carry, at least 19 years old 18 for military)

Nebraska (Permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Ohio (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Oklahoma (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Pennsylvania (resident permits only)

South Carolina (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Tennessee (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Texas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Utah (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

West Virginia (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Wyoming (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)


Permitless Carry States

Alabama (permitless carry, at least 19 years old)

Alaska (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Arizona (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Arkansas (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Florida (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Georgia (Permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Idaho (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Indiana (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Iowa (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Kansas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Kentucky (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Louisiana (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Maine (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Mississippi (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Missouri (permitless carry, at least 19 years old 18 for military)

Montana (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Nebraska (Permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

New Hampshire (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

North Dakota (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Ohio (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Oklahoma (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

South Carolina (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

South Dakota (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Tennessee (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

Texas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Utah (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Vermont (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

West Virginia (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Wyoming (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

*PC-18 = permitless carry if at least 18 years old

*PC-21 = permitless carry if at least 21 years old

Permitless carry includes constitutional carry states as well as states where an individual must meet certain qualifications, e.g., no DUIs in the last 10 years, in order to legally carry (Tennessee). Each state determines the requirements and any limitations on the carry of firearms. Check each state’s page for more information and any restrictions that may apply.


North Carolina Concealed Carry License Information

Processing Time:

The sheriff has 45 days from the time mental health records are received to either issue or deny a permit.

Residency Changes:

Moving to North Carolina and interested in applying for a resident permit? How soon can you apply?North Carolina issues permits to residents and members of the military permanently posted in North Carolina only. You can apply for your permit to the sheriff of your county once you have been a resident of North Carolina for 30 days.

Moving from North Carolina and have a North Carolina resident permit? Does that permit transfer to your new state? Is there a grace period during which your North Carolina permit remains valid?If a person with a North Carolina concealed handgun permit establishes residency in another state, the permit expires upon the establishment of residence in the other state.

Requirements:

An applicant must:

  • Be at least 21 years old;
  • Have completed an approved firearms training class (there are exemptions for law enforcement);
  • Be a United States citizen or lawful permanent resident alien;
  • Be a resident of North Carolina for 30 days preceding the filing of the application;
  • Be a resident of the county in which the application is filed;
  • Not be under indictment for a felony or against whom a finding of probable cause exists for a felony;
  • Not have been adjudicated guilty of a felony in any court, unless: the felony is an offense that pertains to antitrust violations, unfair trade practices or restraints of trade, or the person’s firearm rights have been restored pursuant to state law;
  • Not be a fugitive from justice;
  • Not suffer from a physical or mental infirmity that prevents the safe handling of a handgun;
  • Not have been discharged from the Armed Forces under conditions other than honorable;
  • Not be an unlawful user of or addicted to marijuana, alcohol or any depressant, stimulant or narcotic drug or other controlled substance;
  • Not have been adjudicated guilty of or received a prayer for judgment continued or suspended sentence for one or more specified crimes of violence constituting a misdemeanor within 3 years of the date of application;
  • Not have been adjudicated guilty of or received a prayer for judgment continued or suspended sentence for one or more crimes of violence constituting a misdemeanor for certain types of assault and battery, stalking, child abuse and domestic criminal trespass crimes, and a violation of a protective order;
  • Not have been adjudicated guilty of or received a prayer for judgment continued or suspended sentence for one or more crimes involving an assault or a threat to assault a law enforcement officer, probation or parole officer, person employed at a State or local detention facility, firefighter, emergency medical technician, medical responder or emergency department personnel;
  • Not have been convicted of an impaired driving offense within 3 years prior to the date on which the application is submitted;
  • Not have had judgment continued for or free on bond or personal recognizance pending trial, appeal or sentencing for a disqualifying criminal offense;
  • Not currently be or has not been adjudicated or administratively determined to be lacking mental capacity or mentally ill; and
  • Meet federal law requirements.

*Consult with an attorney if you have any questions about your eligibility. If you don’t have an attorney, you can find one by contacting the State Bar of North Carolina.

Fees:

Initial Permit $90, but varies by county

Renewals $75, but varies by county

Valid For:

5 years

Application:
Non-Resident Concealed Carry Permits:

North Carolina only issues non-resident permits to members of the military permanently posted in North Carolina. The process is the same as for residents.

Name/Address Changes:

You will need to check with your local sheriff’s office as the requirements may vary. This can be done for free in some counties.

Lost/Stolen Permits:

You will need to check with your local sheriff’s office as the requirements may vary. There is a $15 duplicate permit fee.


North Carolina Concealed Carry Permit Application Process

How to Apply for a North Carolina Concealed Carry Permit


Firearms Training Requirements in North Carolina

NC CHP applicants must complete a state-approved training course given by a state-certified trainer. The concealed carry handgun safety class is regulated to be a minimum of 8 hours long and must include a written test on state laws pertaining to the use of deadly force and restrictions on the locations a handgun may be carried in a concealed fashion. In addition, the applicant must shoot a designated course of fire and obtain a passing score.

An approved course must be any course which satisfies the requirements of this subdivision and is certified or sponsored by:

  • The North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission,
  • The National Rifle Association, or
  • A law enforcement agency, college, private or public institution or organization, or firearms training school, taught by instructors certified by the North Carolina Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission or the National Rifle Association.

Find a USCCA Certified Instructor or Firearms Training Class Near You


USCCA train with confidenceUSCCA train with confidenceUSCCA train with confidence

North Carolina Concealed Carry Permit Renewal Process

How to Renew a North Carolina Concealed Carry Permit


Law Enforcement Officers (LEO)/Retired LEOs

Law enforcement officers (LEOs) and Retired LEOs (RLEOs) may choose to carry under the Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA), often referred to as HR 218. Under 18 U.S. Code §§ 926B & 926C, qualified LEOs and qualified retired LEOs, or those separated from service in good standing, can carry a concealed firearm in any jurisdiction in the United States, regardless of state or local laws, with some exceptions. For details check out our Federal Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act (LEOSA) page.

The North Carolina General Assembly enacted legislation to allow for the NC Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission to establish standards and guidelines for the annual firearms certification of qualified retired law enforcement officers. The Commission adopted Administrative Rules 9H .0101 – .015, which establishes that only instructors who hold Specialized Instructor Certification in Firearms issued by the Criminal Justice Education and Training Standards Commission may conduct LEOSA firearms qualification training. 

A retired officer residing in North Carolina may meet the state’s standards in one of two ways:

  • The retired officer may qualify with the agency from which he/she retired. Under this scenario, the agency is responsible for providing documentation to the retired officer to verify their completion of the annual in-service firearms training and qualification requirements. No documentation would have to be submitted to the Criminal Justice Standards Commission by the agency or the officer; or,

  • The retired officer may go to a Criminal Justice Standards Commission-certified law enforcement Specialized Firearms Instructor and complete the training and qualification and then apply to the Commission for certification under the new Retired Law Enforcement Officers Firearms Qualification Certification Program.

Specific information explaining the requirements for participating in this program can be found on the NC DOJ Retired Law Enforcement Officer Firearms Certification page.

  • CCH Carry Guidelines addressing restrictions on carrying concealed firearms by active and retired law enforcement officers and CCH permit holders can also be found at the above NC DOJ link.


North Carolina Location Restrictions

WHERE CAN I CARRY A CONCEALED FIREARM IN NORTH CAROLINA?
  • Carry in bars and restaurants that serve alcohol? Yes, unless posted and provided you do not consume any alcohol or have any alcohol in your system.
  • Carry in my vehicle without a permit/license? No, only with a permit. Without a permit, a concealed handgun must not be readily accessible. Storage in a locked glove box, locked console or in the trunk is lawful. An openly displayed handgun is also allowed. 
  • Carry in roadside rest areas? Yes.
  • Carry in state/national parks, state/national forests, and WMAs? Yes.
  • Carry in places of worship? Yes. However, since places of worship are private property, they may post signs prohibiting firearms. Furthermore, carrying at places of worship that are attached to school properties is now legal (with a concealed handgun permit) so long as school is not in session or children are not present for any school or extracurricular activites. [N.C. Gen. Stat. Section 1.(b)]
WHERE CAN'T I CARRY A CONCEALED FIREARM IN NORTH CAROLINA?
Places off-limits even with a permit/license

FAQ: North Carolina Concealed Carry Questions

CARRY WHILE BOW HUNTING?
Can you concealed carry while bow hunting in North Carolina?

Yes. On State-owned game lands, and all other lands unless prohibited by the landowner, persons may lawfully carry any firearm openly that they are otherwise lawfully entitled to possess, and may also carry a concealed handgun if they possess a current and valid concealed handgun permit issued to them. However, persons may not hunt with any firearm being carried unless such firearm is authorized as a lawful method of take for that open season. The NC Wildlife Resources Commission maintains a list of exempted game lands where concealed carry is prohibited.

[NC Wildlife Resources Commission]

HUNTER HARASSMENT LAW?
Is there a Hunter Harassment Law in North Carolina?

Yes.  It is unlawful for a person to interfere intentionally with the lawful taking of wildlife resources or to drive, harass, or intentionally disturb any wildlife resources for the purpose of disrupting the lawful taking of wildlife resources.  

[N.C.Gen. Stat. Ann. § 113-295]

CARRY WHILE GUN HUNTING?
Can you concealed carry while shotgun/rifle hunting in North Carolina?

Yes.

WHAT ARE THE KNIFE LAWS IN NORTH CAROLINA?

It is illegal to own a spring-loaded projectile knife, ballistic knife or any similar weapon.The open carry of any legal weapon is allowed, so long as you are not carrying it in order to terrify or alarm the public. The concealed carry of Bowie knives, dirks, daggers, razors or butcher’s knives is illegal, except when on the person's own premises. It is illegal to open or concealed carry any knife on a school campus, state property or into a courthouse. Dangerous weapons are also banned from parades, funeral processions, picket lines, or demonstration upon any private health care facilities.

[NCGSA §§ 14-269, 14-269.4 & 14-277.2]

WEAR A COVID MASK & CARRY?
I can legally carry a concealed firearm in North Carolina, but can I wear a COVID 19 protective mask while carrying concealed?

Per § 14-12.7 and § 14-12,8, it is illegal for anyone over 16 years old to wear a mask, hood or disguise that conceals the identity of the wearer, on any public way or on public property in the State. However, a law was enacted during the pandemic to create an exemption.

SB 704/SESSION LAW 2020-3(6) Any person wearing a mask for the purpose of ensuring the physical health or safety of the wearer or others is exempt from the provisions of G.S. 14-12.7, 14-12.8, 14-12.9, 14-12.10 and 14-12.14.


North Carolina Gun Laws Updates

2024-01-01
Updated Places I Can Carry Section to reflect new law on places of worship/schools.
2023-03-30
Permit to purchase no longer required
2021-05-19
Added info on driver's license link to permit in At A Glance table

Did We Miss Something?

Here at the USCCA, it is our mission to provide responsible gun owners with the tools they need to be educated and trained. Our team is constantly working to provide you with the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of self-defense laws available for every state.

If you have any questions that you don’t see answered here — let us know! Just email support@uscca.com and we will be sure to get your question resolved. Your feedback matters to us, and we appreciate you helping to make this page the best possible resource for responsible gun owners!

Permit numbers were obtained from the Crime Prevention Resource Center’s publication entitled, “Concealed Carry Permit Holders Across the United States.” Numbers include resident and non-resident permits for those states that issue both.

The information contained on this website is provided as a service to USCCA, Inc. members and the concealed carry community, and does not constitute legal advice. Although we attempt to address all areas of concealed carry laws in all states, we make no claims, representations, warranties, promises or guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information disclosed. Legal advice must always be tailored to the individual facts and circumstances of each individual case. Laws are constantly changing, and as such, nothing contained on this website should be used as a substitute for the advice of a lawyer.

If you have any questions regarding USCCA Membership, Delta Defense, handguns laws or the lawful process of carrying concealed, please contact the award-winning Delta Defense Customer Engagement Team.