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North Dakota Concealed Carry Reciprocity Map & Gun Laws

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48k
Licenses Issued
38
STATES HONORED
39
RECIPROCATING STATES
761k
STATE POPULATION
18
MINIMUM AGE TO CC
9
ATTORNEYS IN USCCA NETWORK
6.3%
License PERCENTAGE
5
YEARS License VALID
11
USCCA CERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS

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Summary of North Dakota Gun Laws

North Dakota is a shall-issue state, although law enforcement has some discretion in issuing licenses to anyone they have reason to believe is or has been a danger to self or others. Concealed carry licenses are issued at the state level by the attorney general.

No permits, firearms registration or background checks are required to buy a handgun from a private individual.

Open carry of handguns is legal for residents with a Concealed Weapon License (CWL) and for non-residents with a valid resident concealed carry license from a state that North Dakota honors. The minimum age is 18. Some areas are off-limits, including bars.

The definition of concealed carry in North Dakota is if the weapon is carried in such a manner as to not be discernible by the ordinary observation of a passerby. There is no requirement that there be absolute invisibility of the firearm or dangerous weapon, merely that it not be ordinarily discernible. The state allows permitless concealed carry for adults that have been residents for at least 30 days and are not prohibited by state or federal law from possessing a firearm and for non-residents with a valid resident concealed carry license from a state that North Dakota honors. Individuals concealed carrying under permitless carry must carry their driver’s license or state ID and MUST inform law enforcement that they are in possession of the firearm upon any in-person contact by a law enforcement officer. Restrictions on places that a firearm may be possessed still apply. Concealed carry is also legal for non-residents with resident permits from states that North Dakota recognizes.

North Dakota issues Class 1 and Class 2 CWLs. Both licenses are equally valid within North Dakota, but because of additional testing requirements, the holders of a Class 1 license have reciprocity in many more states than those who hold a Class 2 license. CWLs require completion of a state-certified firearms training course. North Dakota issues licenses to full-time active military duty stationed in ND and non-residents if they have a concealed carry permit from their home state, which must have reciprocity with North Dakota. The home state is determined by the driver’s license. In terms of reciprocity, as of August 1, 2021, North Dakota only honors permits from residents of the states it honors.

Self-Defense

North Dakota has a self-defense law based on the Castle Doctrine and based on the Governor’s signing of House Bill 1498, the State has a Stand Your Ground law that went into effect on August 1, 2021. There is no duty to retreat anywhere a person is legally allowed to be. North Dakota law provides immunity from civil liability for an individual who uses force as permitted by state law.

Self-Defense or the Defense of Others
A person is justified in using force to defend himself or herself against danger of imminent unlawful bodily injury, sexual assault or detention by another person. A person is justified in using force in order to defend anyone else if the person defended would be justified in defending himself or herself.

Use of Force in Defense of Premises and Property
Force is justified to prevent or terminate an unlawful entry or other trespass in or upon premises, or to prevent an unlawful carrying away or damaging of property.

Deadly Force

The use of deadly force is not justified if it can be avoided, with safety to the actor and others, by retreat or other conduct involving minimal interference with the freedom of the individual menaced. An individual seeking to protect another individual must, before using deadly force, try to cause the other individual to retreat, or otherwise comply with the requirements of this provision, if safety can be obtained thereby. An individual is not justified in using more force than is necessary and appropriate under the circumstances.There is no duty to retreat anywhere a person is legally allowed to be.

Deadly force is justified in the following instances:

  • When used in lawful self-defense or in lawful defense of others, if such force is necessary to protect the actor or anyone else against death, serious bodily injury or the commission of a violent felony; or
  • When used by an individual in possession or control of a dwelling, place of work, motor vehicle or an occupied motor home or travel trailer, or by an individual who is licensed or privileged to be there, if the force is necessary to prevent commission of arson, burglary, robbery or a violent felony upon or in the dwelling, place of work, motor vehicle or occupied motor home or travel trailer, and the use of force other than deadly force for these purposes would expose any individual to substantial danger of serious bodily injury.

Immunity From Civil Liability for Justifiable Use of Force
Force which is intended or likely to cause death or bodily injury is immune from civil liability or the wrongful death of a person against whom such force was used if the use of such force was justified.

[N.D. Cent. Code §§ 12.1-05-03 thru 12.1-05-07.2]

 

North Dakota Gun Laws at a Glance

Carry Basics

Permitless Carry?

Does North Dakota allow permitless carry?

Yes, North Dakota recognizes permitless concealed carry for residents who have possessed a valid driver's license or nondriver identification card issued by the department of transportation for at least 30 days. Concealed carry is also legal for non-residents with resident permits from states that North Dakota recognizes.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-03-01(2)(a)]

Open Carry Permitted?

Is open carry permitted in North Dakota?

Yes, with a ND concealed weapon license or a resident permit from a state that ND recognizes. In addition, any person to carry an unloaded handgun.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-03-01(1)(a)

Gun Permit Licensure?

If North Dakota requires a license to carry a concealed firearm, how are those licenses issued?

North Dakota is a shall-issue state.

Minimum Age for Concealed Carry?

What is the minimum age in North Dakota to get a concealed carry license?

You must be at least 18 years old to concealed carry in North Dakota.

Weapons Other Than Handguns Allowed?

Can you concealed carry weapons other than handguns in North Dakota with a concealed carry license (or under permitless carry if applicable)?

Yes. Under North Dakota law, “dangerous weapon” includes any switchblade or gravity knife, machete, scimitar, stiletto, sword, dagger, or any knife with a blade 5 inches or longer.

Tasers or Stun Guns?

Is it legal to own a taser or stun gun in North Dakota?

Yes. Stun guns are exempt from the definition of “dangerous weapons" and are legal to purchase and possess without a license. A Taser that only delivers a single application of voltage is not considered a dangerous weapon and may be carried without a concealed weapon license. However, if the Taser is capable of delivering multiple applications of voltage, you must have a concealed weapon license. Stun guns and Tasers are not allowed in that part of the establishment that is set aside for the retail sale of alcoholic beverages and the consumption of purchased alcoholic beverages or used as a gaming site at which bingo is the primary gaming activity 

[ND Atty Genl Information page and N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-04]

Chemical Spray/Pepper Spray?

Is it legal to buy or use chemical spray/pepper spray in North Dakota?

Yes, defensive sprays are exempt from the definition of “dangerous weapons" and therefore you do not need a concealed weapon license to carry those items concealed (e.g., in a purse or bag, under clothing, under the vehicle seat or in the vehicle’s glove box) within North Dakota.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-01-01]
[N.D. Atty Genl Information Page]

MAGAZINE LIMITS FOR HANDGUNS?

Does North Dakota have magazine capacity restrictions for handguns?

No. North Dakota imposes no limit on maximum handgun magazine capacity.

AMMUNITION RESTRICTIONS?

Does North Dakota have ammunition restrictions?

No. There are no restricted handgun ammo types in North Dakota.

Puzzled by Reciprocity Laws?
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Carry Locations

Carry in Vehicle?

Can you carry a concealed handgun in a vehicle in North Dakota?

Yes, for an individual who is not otherwise precluded from possessing a class 2 firearm and dangerous weapon license under chapter 62.1-04 and who has been a resident for at least 30 days with a valid driver’s license or State ID. Non-residents must have a resident concealed carry permit from a state that ND honors. If the firearm is not loaded, a person may carry or possess it in a motor vehicle, concealed or unconcealed, even without a license.

[N.D. Cent. Code §§ 62.1-02-10, 62.1-03-01]

Carry at Roadside Rest Areas?

Can you carry a concealed firearm at roadside rest areas in North Dakota?

Yes, under permitless concealed carry for residents and for non-residents with a resident permit from states that North Dakota recognizes.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-05.2.k]

Carry in State/National Parks, State/National Forests and Wildlife Management Areas (WMAs)?

Can you carry a concealed firearm in state/national parks, state/national forests and Wildlife Management Areas in North Dakota?

Yes, under permitless concealed carry for residents and for non-residents with a resident permit from states that North Dakota recognizes. See the National Parks webpage for links to each Park in North Dakota.

[State Forest Guide]
[N.D.Admin. Code § 30-04-02-05
[N. D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-05.2.i]

Carry in Bars/Restaurants That Serve Alcohol?

Can you carry a concealed firearm in bars and restaurants that serve alcohol in North Dakota?

You can concealed carry in the restaurant area of an eatery that serves alcohol under permitless concealed carry for residents and for non-residents with a resident permit from states that North Dakota recognizes, unless posted. However, concealed carry is not allowed in bars or the bar areas of restaurants.

[N.D.Cent. Code § 62.1-02-04.2.f

Carry/Possess at a hotel?

Can you carry or possess a firearm on hotel property in North Dakota?

North Dakota statutes don't specifically address firearms at hotels. Please note that each hotel develops their own policies and the individual hotel should be contacted to inquire about it's concealed carry policy. See the Handguns at Hotels page for additional information.

Store in a Vehicle in an Employee Parking Lot?

Does North Dakota have laws relating to storing firearms in private vehicles in an employee parking lot?

A public or private employer may not prohibit any customer, employee or invitee from possessing any legally owned firearm, if the firearm is lawfully possessed and locked inside or locked to a private motor vehicle in a parking lot and if the customer, employee or invitee is lawfully in the area. Some parking areas are prohibited including school property, correctional facilities and institutions and businesses involved with homeland security or national defense, among others.

[N.D.Cent. Code § 62.1-02-13]

Key State Laws

Duty to Inform Officer You're Carrying?

Do you have a duty to inform a police officer that you're carrying a concealed firearm in North Dakota?

There is no duty to inform a law enforcement officer that you're carrying a concealed firearm for anyone with a concealed carry license.

Yes, for ND residents carrying without a license.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-04-04]

DRIVER'S LICENSE LINKED TO Carry License?

Is my North Dakota driver’s license linked to my North Dakota carry license?

No. Your North Dakota driver’s license is not linked to your North Dakota concealed weapon license. Therefore, a law enforcement officer (LEO) will not be notified that you are a concealed carry license holder immediately when they run your driver’s license. However, LEOs may have access to other databases where they can obtain this information.

"No Weapons Allowed" Signs Enforced?

Are "No Weapons Allowed" signs enforced in North Dakota? If yes, violating the sign would be considered to be a crime. If no, violating the sign would not be considered a criminal offense.

No. North Dakota does not recognize "No Weapons Allowed" signs.

Preemption?

Does North Dakota have preemption laws related to concealed carry (i.e. Does state law supersede local laws regarding the possession of handguns)?

Yes, the state has preemption of firearms laws relating to the purchase, sale, ownership, possession, transfer of ownership, registration, or licensure of firearms and ammunition in North Dakota.  Based on the passage of HB 1248 on April 27, 2021, all such existing municipal ordinances are void and an individual may bring a civil action against a political subdivision for damages as a result of an unlawful ordinance.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-01-03]

Red Flag Law?

Does North Dakota have a red flag law?

North Dakota does not have a red flag law.

Brandishing?

Does North Dakota state law define brandishing?

Based on the passage of HB 1498, as of August 1, 2021, an individual may brandish a dangerous weapon while on property owned or leased by the individual.

[per HB 1498, a new section is added to chapter 62.1-02]

An individual is guilty of disorderly conduct if, with intent to harass, annoy or alarm another person or in reckless disregard of the fact that another person is harassed, annoyed or alarmed by the individual's behavior, the individual engages in fighting, or in violent, tumultuous or threatening behavior; or creates a hazardous, physically offensive or seriously alarming condition by any act that serves no legitimate purpose; or engages in harassing conduct by means of intrusive or unwanted acts, words or gestures that are intended to adversely affect the safety, security or privacy of another person.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 12.1-31-01]

A person is guilty of menacing if he knowingly places or attempts to place another human being in fear by menacing him with imminent serious bodily injury. 

[N.D. Cent. Code § 12.1-17-05]

Carry While Using Alcohol or Drugs?

Does North Dakota have laws regarding carrying a concealed firearm while using alcohol or drugs?

Although in the Game, Fish & Predators section of the ND Century Code, no person may be afield at any time, with a gun or other firearm while intoxicated or under the influence of alcoholic beverages or drugs.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-01-06]

As a responsibly armed American, regardless of the laws in your state, it is unwise to carry while under the influence of any substance that could impair your judgement, slow your reaction times, or impact your decision-making abilities. Any decision you make while carrying a firearm could have life-altering consequences.

NON-RESIDENT PERMITTING?

Does North Dakota issue concealed carry licenses to non-residents?

Yes, for those that have a concealed carry permit from their home state, which must have reciprocity with North Dakota. The process is the same as for residents.

PUBLIC ACCESS TO CONCEALED CARRY REGISTRY?

Does North Dakota allow the public to access concealed carry registry information through public records law?

No, however the information is available to the courts.

Handgun Purchase & Possession

Purchase Permits?

Is a permit required to purchase a handgun in North Dakota?

No. A special permit is not required for buying a handgun in North Dakota.

Background Checks for Private Gun Sales?

Are background checks required for private gun sales in North Dakota?

No. Private firearms transfers are not subject to a background check requirement, although federal and state purchaser prohibitions, including age restrictions, still apply. It is recommended that you retain any sales receipts to prove ownership of the gun.

North Dakota license Exempts from Background Check?

Does my current North Dakota concealed carry license exempt me from needing a background check when I purchase a firearm?

Yes.

Waiting Period?

Is there a waiting period after purchasing a handgun in North Dakota?

No. North Dakota does not have a waiting period for handgun purchases.

Handgun Registration?

Do handguns need to be registered in North Dakota?

No. Handguns do not need to be registered in North Dakota.

Minimum Age to Possess and Transport?

What is the minimum age to possess and transport a handgun in North Dakota?

18 years old is the minimum age to possess and transport a handgun in North Dakota. A person under the age of 18 may only possess a handgun while under the direct supervision of an adult for purposes of firearm safety training, target shooting, or hunting.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-01]

Possess a handgun on my private property without a license?

Can I possess/carry a handgun in my home without a license?

Yes. A concealed carry license is not required for anyone legally entitled to carry a firearm to carry a handgun on the person's land, or in that individual's permanent or temporary residence, or fixed place of business.

[N.D. Cent. Code 62.1-03-01]

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State Constitutional Provision
All individuals . . . have certain inalienable rights, among which are . . . to keep and bear arms for the defense of their person, family, property and the state, and for lawful hunting, recreational and other lawful purposes, which shall not be infringed."
ARTICLE 1, § L

North Dakota Concealed Carry Reciprocity With Other States

Which states' permits does North Dakota honor?

As of August 1, 2021,In accordance with N.D.C.C. § 62.1-04-03.1, North Dakota will honor a valid concealed carry license/permit (resident and non-resident) issued by a state that has agreed to recognize a North Dakota license.


Other States' Reciprocity With North Dakota

Which states honor permits from North Dakota?

Arkansas (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
Idaho (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
Mississippi (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
Montana (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
Nevada (Class 1 only)
New Hampshire (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
South Dakota (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)
Vermont (permitless carry, at least 18 years old)

North Dakota residents can carry a concealed defensive firearm in the state of Oklahoma without any type of license. You must carry your driver's license or state issued ID when carrying your firearm in Oklahoma.

Note: Firearms must be carried in accordance with the laws of the state you are visiting. Be sure to check the laws of the other state before traveling there with your firearms.


States That Have Restricted Reciprocity with North Dakota

North Dakota offers resident and limited non-resident licenses. If indicated with “Resident only” below, that state only honors North Dakota resident licenses (and not those issued to non-residents).

Arizona (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Alaska (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Colorado (at least 21 years old and resident permits only)
Delaware (Class 1 permits only)
Florida (at least 21 years old and resident permits only)
Iowa (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Kansas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Kentucky (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Louisiana (at least 21 years old)
Maine (resident permits recognized if at least 21 years old; see Maine Reciprocity section for details)
Michigan (at least 21 years old and resident permits only)
Minnesota (Class 1 permits only and at least 21 years old)
Missouri (permitless carry, at least 19 years old, 18 for military)
Nebraska (Class 1 permits only)
New Mexico (at least 21 years old)
Ohio (at least 21 years old)
Oklahoma (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Pennsylvania (Class 1 permits only and at least 21 years old and resident permits only)
South Carolina (Enhanced permits only and at least 21 years old and resident permits only)
Tennessee (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Texas (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Utah (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Virginia (Class 1 permits only and at least 21 years old)
Washington (Class 1 permits only)
West Virginia (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)
Wisconsin (Class 1 permits only and at least 21 years old)
Wyoming (permitless carry, at least 21 years old)

Permitless Carry States

Alaska PC-21
Arizona PC-21
Arkansas PC-18
Idaho PC-18
Iowa PC-18
Kansas PC-21
Kentucky PC-21
Maine (permits recognized; see Maine Reciprocity section for details or PC-21)
Mississippi PC-18
MontanaPC-18
North DakotaPC-18 for residents only
Oklahoma PC-21
TexasPC-21
UtahPC-21
VermontPC-18
Wyoming PC-21

*PC-18 = permitless carry if at least 18 years old

*PC-21 = permitless carry if at least 21 years old

Permitless carry includes constitutional carry states as well as states where an individual must meet certain qualifications, e.g., no DUIs in the last 10 years, in order to legally carry (Tennessee). Each state determines the requirements and any limitations on the carry of firearms. Check each state’s page for more information and any restrictions that may apply.


North Dakota Concealed Carry License Information

Requirements:

An applicant must

  • Be at least age 18 for a Class 2 license; age 21 for a Class 1 license;
  • Be a resident of North Dakota; OR on full-time active military duty stationed in ND; OR a resident of a state that has reciprocity with ND and who possesses a valid concealed weapon license in their home state;
  • Have successfully completed the training requirements;
  • Not be an individual specified in section 62.1-02-01 and for a class 1 firearm license the applicant must:
    • Not have been convicted of a felony;
    • Not have been convicted of a crime of violence;
    • Not have been convicted of an offense involving the use of alcohol within 3 years prior to the date of application;
    • Not have been convicted of a misdemeanor offense involving the unlawful use of
      narcotics or other controlled substances within 10 years prior to the date of
      application;
    • Not have been convicted of an offense involving moral turpitude;
    • Not have been convicted of an offense involving domestic violence;
    • Not have been adjudicated by a state or federal court as mentally incompetent,
      unless the adjudication has been withdrawn or reversed; and
    • Be qualified to purchase and possess a firearm under federal law; and
  • Satisfactorily complete the Bureau of Criminal Investigation (BCI) application form and successfully pass the criminal history records check conducted by the BCI and FBI. This includes information on any court-ordered treatment or commitment for mental health, alcohol or substance abuse.The applicant shall provide the director of the BCI written authorizations for disclosure of the applicant's mental health and alcohol or substance abuse evaluation and treatment records. The bureau may deny approval for a license if the bureau has reasonable cause to believe that the applicant or licensee has been or is a danger to self or others as demonstrated by evidence, including past pattern of behavior involving unlawful violence or threats of unlawful violence; past participation in incidents involving unlawful violence or threats of unlawful violence; or conviction of a weapons offense. In determining whether the applicant or licensee has been or is a danger to self or others, the bureau may inspect expunged or sealed records of arrests and convictions of adults and juvenile court records.
Fees:

Initial licenses and renewals:  $60

Valid For:

5 years

Processing Time:

60 days

Application:
Class 1/Class 2 Licenses

Class 1/Class 2 Licenses

The only difference between a Class 1 license and a Class 2 license is reciprocity.
Both licenses are equally valid within North Dakota, but because of additional testing requirements, the holders of a Class 1 license have reciprocity in many more states than those who hold a Class 2 license.

Note: An individual who has a valid Class 2 license may apply to upgrade to a Class 1 license within 5 years from the date the Class 2 license was issued, by completing the additional testing requirements of a Class 1 license and submitting an application form along with the $60 application fee and required documents.

Non-Resident Concealed Carry licenses:

North Dakota issues licenses to full-time active military duty stationed in ND and residents of states which have reciprocity with North Dakota, provided the individual possesses a valid concealed carry permit from that state. However, all testing must take place within the state of ND and cannot be held in conjunction with testing for any other state. The application must be submitted to the BCI within 30 days of the testing date.

Name/Address Changes:

By law, you must notify the BCI of a change of address. Mail a letter with your full legal name, date of birth, old address and new address, and the effective date of the new address to:

BCI CWL – ADDRESS CHANGE
PO Box 1054
Bismarck, ND 58502
For security reasons, the BCI can only accept a change of address notification received by mail.

If you would like a replacement license with your new address, you must send in the old license with your address change letter. If you do not send in the old license, the BCI will not issue an updated license. You are not required to get an updated license - your license is still valid even if it has your old address. If you send in your license to have it updated, you cannot carry concealed until you receive the updated license. Please allow 2 - 3 weeks for the updated license to be issued.

Lost/Stolen licenses:

You may request a free replacement from the BCI. Simply send a written request to the BCI and include your full name, current address, date of birth and the reason you need a replacement license.

Residency Changes:

Moving to North Dakota and interested in applying for a resident license? How soon can you apply?
North Dakota issues licenses to residents, full-time active military duty stationed in the state and to concealed carry permit holders of states which have reciprocity with North Dakota. You can apply for your license at any time. In order to apply for a resident license, you may need to provide a North Dakota driver's license or state ID.

Moving from North Dakota and have a North Dakota resident license? Does that license transfer to your new state? Is there a grace period during which your North Dakota license remains valid?
If a person with a North Dakota concealed weapon license establishes residency in another state, the license is valid until it expires provided the individual notifies the BCI of a change of address.


North Dakota Concealed Carry License Application Process

How to Apply for a North Dakota Concealed Carry License

Step 1:

All new applicants must complete the required training before submitting an application. Contact a test administrator to schedule your training and testing. Check with the test administrator before completing the application - many test administrators provide a computer and printer at the training site for this purpose. 

Step 2:

Decide if you want a Class 1 or Class 2 license.

  • Complete the ONLINE APPLICATION You will need a printer. The last step of the online application process generates a form that you are required to print; OR
  • Download the application, complete it and print out a copy to mail in; OR
  • Complete it at the testing site, if available.
Step 3:

Make an appointment with a test administrator and take a copy of the printed application to the testing appointment.The test administrator may charge up to $50 (plus range fees, if applicable). All first-time applicants must pass a written, open-book test based on the Concealed Weapon License Manual.

All testing must take place within the state of North Dakota and cannot be held in conjunction with testing for any other state. The application must be submitted to the BCI within 30 days of the testing date.

Step 4:

Applicants for a Class 1 license will also need to complete classroom instruction, demonstrate familiarity with the weapon, and successfully complete a firearms proficiency shooting test.

Step 5:

Gather the following required documents and submit them to the Bureau of Criminal Inspection (BCI) within 30 days of the testing date (Applications submitted more than 30 days after the testing date are invalid and cannot be processed):

  • Cashiers check or money order for $60 payable to “North Dakota Attorney General”;
  • Photocopy of a driver's license or state ID;
  • Two official color passport photos; and
  • Two fingerprint cards (for new applicants).

Non-residents must include a copy of a valid concealed carry license from your home state of residence. (You are a resident of whichever state issued your driver’s license.) If your state does not have reciprocity with ND, you are not eligible for a ND license.

Non-resident active duty military must include a copy of your PCS orders to ND.

Applicants born outside of the U.S. must be a legal resident of the US. If you were born outside the U.S. or its territories, attach a copy of your US-issued Born Abroad birth certificate OR the Alien Registration/INS Registration documentation OR a Naturalization certificate OR a valid US Passport.

Mail the completed application and all required documents to:

    BCI-CWL
    P.O. Box 1054
    Bismarck ND 58502

The BCI does not accept applications submitted by fax, email or hand delivery.

Step 6:

You will be notified if your application has been approved.


Firearms Training Requirements in North Dakota

Applicants must successfully complete a testing procedure conducted by a certified test administrator. An applicant must be 21 years of age for a Class 1 license and at least 18 years of age for a Class 2 license. An applicant for a Class 1 license and Class 1 license renewal must:

  • Participate in classroom instruction that sets forth weapon safety rules and the deadly force law of North Dakota;
  • Complete an open-book test based upon a manual;
  • Demonstrate familiarity with a firearm or dangerous weapon, through certification by a certified instructor, participation in an organized shooting competition or dangerous weapon course of training, or possession of a license from another state, or evidence of weapons experience during military service; and
  • Complete an actual shooting or certified proficiency exercise.

An applicant for a Class 2 license is required to successfully complete the open-book test offered for the Class 1 license, but no live fire component.

All testing must take place within the state of North Dakota and cannot be held in conjunction with testing for any other state. 

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Find a Shooting Range in North Dakota


North Dakota Concealed Carry License Renewal Process

How to Renew a North Dakota Concealed Carry License

Step 1:
Renewals are the responsibility of the licensee. The BCI will send a renewal reminder to the last address we have on file. You may begin the renewal process up to 180 days prior to the license expiration date through the expiration date. A renewal application must be postmarked on or before the license expiration date. Late or incomplete applications cannot be processed. If your license has expired, it is not a valid license and cannot be renewed. You will have to start over as a new applicant. IF YOUR LICENSE HAS EXPIRED, DO NOT CARRY CONCEALED!
Step 2:

Review the requirements.

To renew a Class 1 license, you will need to complete the full testing process, just as you did for your initial license.

You can “downgrade” to a class 2 license and avoid having to retest by indicating on the application that you would like a class 2 license. You do not have to retest to renew a class 2 license.

To "upgrade" an expiring Class 2 license to a Class 1 license, you must complete the application process for a Class 1 license including the required testing, documents and fees.

Step 3:

Make an appointment with a test administrator and take a copy of the printed application to the testing appointment. All first-time applicants must pass a written, open-book test based on the Concealed Weapon License Manual.

Step 4:

Applicants for a Class 1 license will also need to complete classroom instruction, demonstrate familiarity with the weapon, and successfully complete a firearms proficiency shooting test.

Step 5:

Complete the Online Application or print a blank application to complete and submit to the BCI. Be aware that it takes the BCI longer to process these handwritten applications, which may result in a delay issuing your license. Therefore, the BCI encourages you to complete the Online Application if at all possible.

Step 6:

You will be notified if your application has been approved.



North Dakota Location Restrictions

Where Can I Carry a Concealed Firearm in North Dakota?
  • Carry in bars/restaurants that serve alcohol? You can concealed carry in the restaurant area of an eatery that serves alcohol, unless posted. However, concealed carry is not allowed in bars or the bar areas of restaurants.
  • Carry in my vehicle without a permit/license? Yes, for an individual who is not otherwise precluded from possessing a class 2 firearm and dangerous weapon license under chapter 62.1-04 and who has been a resident for at least 30 days with a valid driver’s license or State ID. Non-residents must have a concealed carry permit from a state that ND honors.
  • Carry in roadside rest areas? Yes.
  • Carry in state/national parks, state/national forests, and WMAs? Yes.
Where Can't I Carry a Concealed Firearm in North Dakota?

Places off-limits even with a permit/license

Based on the passage of HB 1297, as of August 1, 2021: 

  • Schools or school-sponsored events on school property;
  • Churches or other places of worship without permission; and
  • Publicly owned or operated buildings.

[N.D. Cent. Code § 62.1-02-05]


FAQ: North Dakota Concealed Carry Questions

What Are the Knife Laws in North Dakota?

It is legal to own any type of knife in North Dakota. It is legal to open carry any type of knife. It is legal to conceal carry dangerous weapons with a concealed carry license. Permitless carry does not extend to knives. Dangerous weapons include any switchblade or gravity knife, machete, scimitar, stiletto, sword, dagger or any knife with a blade 5 inches or longer. A dangerous weapon is considered to be concealed if it is worn on the body or kept in a vehicle where it is within reach of the carrier and is not discernible as a weapon by ordinary observation. It is not considered to be concealed if it is locked in a trunk or luggage compartment of a vehicle, carried in a holster or case where it is wholly or substantially visible, or carried in any manner while lawfully hunting, trapping or target shooting.

Possession of firearms and dangerous weapons is prohibited at certain public events and gatherings, as well as schools and school functions. North Dakota municipalities, such as Bismark, Fargo and Grand Forks, may have additional restrictions.

[NDCC §§ 62.1-01-01, 62.1-02-04, 62.1-02-05, 62.1-04-0162.1-04-02]

WEAR A COVID MASK & CARRY?

I can legally carry a concealed firearm in North Dakota, but can I wear a COVID 19 protective mask while carrying concealed?

There is no known statute in North Dakota making it illegal to wear a COVID mask while carrying concealed. A state statute was identified that refers to individuals concealing their identity with the intention to commit illegal acts or with intent to intimidate, however they do not address wearing a mask while legally carrying a concealed firearm.

[NDCC § 12.1-31-15(1)] 

CARRY WHILE GUN HUNTING?

Can you concealed carry while shotgun/rifle hunting in North Dakota?

Yes.

CARRY WHILE BOW HUNTING?

Can you concealed carry while bow hunting in North Dakota?

Yes, but only if you are going to fill your gun license. No firearms, except handguns, may be in the hunter’s possession while hunting with a deer bow license. A handgun may not be used in any manner to assist in the harvest of a deer with an archery license.

[ND Game & Fish FAQ]

HUNTER HARASSMENT LAW?

Is there a Hunter Harassment Law in North Dakota?

Yes. An individual may not intentionally interfere with the lawful taking of wildlife on public or private land by another or intentionally harass, drive, or disturb any wildlife on public or private land for the purpose of disrupting a lawful hunt. 

[N.D. Cent. Code § 20.1-01-31]


North Dakota Gun Laws Updates:

Date Details
2021-08-04

Updated info on license requirements per HB-1450 in License Requirements section

2021-08-03

Updated info on the new Stand Your Ground law per HB-1498 in the Summary

2021-05-19

Added info on driver's license link to permit in At A Glance table

2021-04-28

Per HB 1297, updated can't carry locations in the Location Restrictions section

2021-04-28

Per HB 1248, updated [preemption info}(#aag_rel) in At A Glance table

2021-04-28

Per HB 1293, updated Permitless Carry & Open Carry requirements to the At A Glance table and Summary

2021-04-21

Updated info on brandishing in At A Glance table

2021-04-21

Updated info on the new Stand Your Ground law in the Summary

2020-09-03

Added information on Self Defense in the Summary

2020-07-01

Added information on wearing a COVID 19 mask while carrying concealed above the Summary

2020-05-06

Added info on handguns at hotels in At A Glance table

2020-04-20

Added info on handguns on private property in At A Glance table

2020-04-06

Added info on private gun sales in At A Glance table

2020-02-25

Added info on carry in bars to the At A Glance table

2020-02-19

Added related blog posts with links

2020-02-17

Added info regarding residency changes and resulting impacts on carry permits

2020-01-30

Updated the knife laws and added statutory references

2019-12-04

Added info on whether a valid state ccw permit exempts a person from needing a background check when purchasing a firearm to the At A Glance table

2019-12-03

Added the Capitol grounds to can’t carry locations

2019-11-21

Added statutory references and links for can’t carry locations

2019-11-04

Added brandishing info to At A Glance table

2019-10-15

Added Hunter Harassment info to At A Glance table

2019-10-01

Added Chemical Spray/Pepper Spray to the At A Glance table

2019-09-09

Added Carry While Hunting info to At A Glance table

2019-08-13

Added anchor links to various sections below the Summary

2019-07-26

Added minimum age to possess and transport a handgun to At A Glance table

2019-05-24

Added stun gun/Taser info to At A Glance table

2019-05-03

Added permit renewal and name/address change info

2019-04-19

Links checked

2019-03-29

Added info on state implementation of Law Enforcement Officer Safety Act (LEOSA)

2019-02-15

Added pages for Federal Gun Laws, Traveling with Firearms & Terminology

2019-02-09

Added ammunition restrictions to At A Glance table

2019-02-06

Added red flag law info to At A Glance table

2019-01-25

Added church carry info to location restrictions section

2019-01-25

Removed expired link

2019-01-24

Added info about alcohol or prescription medication in At A Glance table

2019-01-10

Mag limit added to At A Glance table

Did We Miss Something?

Here at the USCCA, it is our mission to provide responsible gun owners with the tools they need to be educated and trained. Our team is constantly working to provide you with the most up-to-date and comprehensive list of self-defense laws available for every state.

If you have any questions that you don’t see answered here — let us know! Just email [email protected] and we will be sure to get your question resolved. Your feedback matters to us, and we appreciate you helping to make this page the best possible resource for responsible gun owners!

Permit numbers were obtained from the Crime Prevention Resource Center’s publication entitled, “Concealed Carry Permit Holders Across the United States.” Numbers include resident and non-resident permits for those states that issue both.

The information contained on this website is provided as a service to USCCA, Inc. members and the concealed carry community, and does not constitute legal advice. Although we attempt to address all areas of concealed carry laws in all states, we make no claims, representations, warranties, promises or guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information disclosed. Legal advice must always be tailored to the individual facts and circumstances of each individual case. Laws are constantly changing, and as such, nothing contained on this website should be used as a substitute for the advice of a lawyer.

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