Self-Defense Terms

Internationally recognized self-defense expert Massad Ayoob states it best, “Deadly force is justified only when undertaken to prevent imminent and otherwise unavoidable danger of death or grave bodily harm to the innocent.”

Since the late 1990s, as states passed concealed carry laws, many states have strengthened self-defense laws to alloow the use of deadly force. These include what are sometimes called “Duty to Retreat,” “Stand Your Ground” and “Castle Doctrine” laws. In general, these laws state that a citizen has no duty to retreat from an altercation and if self-defense actions are warranted, citizens can stand their ground and defend themselves, and that homeowners may use deadly force in defense against anyone committing a burglary to an occupied dwelling.

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