Carrying a firearm for self-defense comes with a lot of responsibility. Knowing the laws where you carry is just one important task you must undertake as an armed American. To help with that, we will be providing you with a summary of basic carry laws for several states. Learn about the most important things to know when carrying in Vermont, the Green Mountain State.

Permitting in Vermont

Vermont is the only U.S. state that does not issue concealed carry permits. Both open carry and concealed carry are legal without a permit in Vermont. Any person 16 or older (although federal law requires the age to be 18) who can legally possess a firearm is allowed to carry openly or concealed.

Stun guns, Tasers and pepper spray are legal to purchase and possess without a permit. A permit is not required to purchase a handgun in Vermont. Firearms transfers must be completed through a licensed firearms dealer and require a background check. There are exemptions for transfers between immediate family members and transfers to another person in order to prevent imminent harm. There is no firearms registration or waiting period after purchasing a handgun. There is no duty to inform a law enforcement officer that you’re carrying a concealed firearm in the state.

While Vermont does not have any ammunition restrictions, magazine capacity is limited to no more than 15 rounds for handguns.

Where Can One Carry in Vermont?

Anyone at least 18 years old and not otherwise prohibited by statute from possessing a firearm may carry a handgun in a vehicle and at roadside rest areas in Vermont.

Additional locations where a concealed handgun may be carried include:

  • Restaurants that serve alcohol (unless posted)
  • State/national parks
  • State/national forests
  • Wildlife Management Areas
  • Places of worship (unless posted)

Locations where carry is prohibited, include:

  • Any elementary, middle or high school, including buildings and grounds and on a school bus
  • Mud Creek Controlled Hunting Area in Alburg
  • Residential Treatment Program properties
  • Any private preserve without written consent of the owner or person having the exclusive right to take fish or wild animals on such lands
  • The Bomoseen State Game Refuge
  • Any courthouse
  • Any state institution
  • Any state building
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law or state law or regulation

Visit the USCCA Vermont gun laws page now…