Basic Carry Laws: Arizona

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Carrying a firearm for self-defense comes with a lot of responsibility. Knowing the laws where you carry is just one important task armed Americans must undertake. To help with that, we will be providing you with a summary of basic carry laws for several states. Learn about the most important things to know while carrying in Arizona below.

Getting a Permit to Carry in Arizona

Since Arizona has permitless carry, any person who is at least 18 years old who can legally possess a firearm may open carry. Any person at least 21 years old may carry a concealed firearm without a permit. Arizona issues Concealed Weapons Permits (CWP) to residents and non-residents for reciprocity purposes. It requires a firearms training course that has been state-approved. You may also carry a small chemical dispenser of pepper spray (sold commercially for personal protection), a stun gun or a Taser. All are legal to purchase and possess without a permit.

Permits are not required when buying a handgun, and there is no firearms registration in Arizona. Buying a handgun from a private individual does not require a background check. A purchaser must be at least 18 years old to buy a gun from a private individual. The minimum age to purchase a handgun from a federally licensed dealer is 21. There is also no magazine capacity restrictions or mandatory waiting period for handgun purchases.

Where Can One Carry?

In terms of locations where a concealed handgun may be carried, anyone who is 21 years old and legally entitled to carry a firearm can carry a concealed handgun without a permit in a vehicle in Arizona. There is a duty to inform a law enforcement officer that you’re carrying a concealed firearm only when specifically asked. Anyone who is under 21 years old is required to keep his or her firearm(s) in plain view from outside of his or her vehicle. Carry is also allowed at roadside rest areas without a permit. Other areas where permit holders can carry concealed are:

  • Restaurants that serve alcohol, unless posted, and provided no alcohol is consumed
  • State/national parks
  • State/national forests
  • Wildlife Management Areas
  • Places of worship, unless posted

Where Is Off-Limits in Arizona?

Locations where carry is prohibited even for permit holders include:

  • The grounds of any public school (Handguns inside of vehicles must be unloaded before entering school grounds. If you have to exit your vehicle, the handgun(s) must be unloaded and secured within the vehicle and out of plain view.)
  • The three Arizona State universities (except in a locked and privately owned motor vehicle or in a locked compartment (not visible from the outside) on the person’s privately owned motorcycle)
  • Any establishment or event open to the public where the operator makes a reasonable request for you to give him or her custody or remove the weapon from the premises (A sign would qualify for such request. By law, cities and counties are required to offer on-site storage if they ban weapons, but not all are in compliance.)
  • On the premises of an on-sale liquor retailer while consuming alcohol or where the retailer has posted a sign prohibiting weapons
  • Correctional facilities
  • Game preserves
  • Secure areas of airports
  • Polling places on election day
  • Nuclear or hydroelectric generating stations
  • Any place where the carrying of firearms is prohibited by federal law or state law or regulation

Visit the USCCA Arizona gun laws page now…

The information contained on this website is provided as a service to USCCA, Inc. members and the concealed carry community and does not constitute legal advice. Although we attempt to address all areas of concealed carry laws in all states, we make no claims, representations, warranties, promises or guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information disclosed. Legal advice must always be tailored to the individual facts and circumstances of each individual case. Laws are constantly changing, and, as such, nothing contained on this website should be used as a substitute for the advice of a lawyer.

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