Illinois Gun Laws: What You Need to Know

As a responsibly armed American, you already know how challenging it can be to stay up to date on Illinois gun laws.

Illinois gun owners, you’re in luck. We’ve gathered some of the most frequently asked Illinois firearms questions. Read on for answers to some of the top questions regarding Illinois gun laws. (Not from Illinois? Don’t worry, your state is coming soon…)

Are You Allowed to Carry a Gun in Illinois?

Illinois does not permit open carry. However, concealed carry is legal with an Illinois Concealed Carry License (CCL). Only residents of Arkansas, Mississippi, Texas and Virginia may apply for non-resident licenses. Illinois does not honor concealed carry permits from any other states.

What States Have Concealed Carry Reciprocity With Illinois?

Illinois will not honor concealed carry permits from any other states. However, 18 states honor Illinois CCLs. They can be found on the USCCA’s Concealed Carry Reciprocity & Gun Laws Map.

Other states’ reciprocity with Illinois: Alabama, Iowa, Montana, North Carolina, South Dakota, Utah, Idaho, Kentucky, Nebraska, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, Indiana, Minnesota, Nevada, Oklahoma, Texas and Wisconsin.

Can I Own a Gun If I Have a Medical Card in Illinois?

Federal law prohibits medical marijuana users from possessing or buying firearms and ammunition — even if state law allows the drug’s use. An individual can’t have both licenses. Under federal law, you are an unlawful user of a controlled substance. The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld this rule. Marijuana in any form is illegal under federal law. Users of marijuana are prohibited persons. Checking “no” on question 11(e) on Form 4473 would be a lie if you use marijuana. See this ATF letter on the topic.

Can a Non-Resident Carry a Gun in Illinois?

Yes, but only a resident of a state or territory of the United States that has laws substantially similar to the requirements to obtain a license under the Firearm Concealed Carry Act is eligible. Arkansas, Mississippi, Texas and Virginia are currently the only states considered to be substantially similar.

Can I Carry a Gun in My Car While Traveling in Illinois?

Yes, only with a CCL [430 Ill. Comp. Stat. § 66/10(c)]. A non-resident may transport a loaded concealed handgun in a vehicle if he or she has a valid CCW permit in his or her home state. The individual cannot under any circumstances remove the firearm from the vehicle. If he/she needs to exit the vehicle, he or she must lock it or place the firearm in a locked container.

What Are the Shooting Requirements for Illinois CCL?

Proof of certification by a certified instructor that the applicant passed a live-fire exercise with a concealable firearm consisting of:

  • A minimum of 30 rounds and
  • 10 rounds from a distance of 5 yards, 10 rounds from a distance of 7 yards and 10 rounds from a distance of 10 yards at a target approved by the Department of State Police.

Can You Openly Carry a Gun in Illinois?

No. Open carry is not legal in Illinois.

Ready to Learn More About Illinois Gun Laws?

It is your responsibility as a gun owner to know and understand the laws regarding your concealed carry rights. The USCCA's Concealed Carry Reciprocity & Gun Laws Map has been designed to help inform and educate armed citizens like you. To learn more about Illinois’ concealed carry permit application process, concealed carry restrictions and training requirements, visit the Illinois gun laws page now...

The information contained on this website is provided as a service to USCCA, Inc. Members and the concealed carry community and does not constitute legal advice. Although we attempt to address all areas of concealed carry laws in all states, we make no claims, representations, warranties, promises or guarantees as to the accuracy, completeness or adequacy of the information disclosed. Legal advice must always be tailored to the individual facts and circumstances of each individual case, and laws are constantly changing; as such, nothing contained on this website should be used as a substitute for the advice of a lawyer.