6/5/4 Drill

target shooting

The target contains the outline of an eight-inch circle, the outline of a standard business card, and the outline of a six-inch circle.

I travel all over the country teaching defensive firearms use, and I see the same problems among shooters everywhere I go.

One of the most basic, pervasive, and common problem areas is that of timing. Most untrained shooters have no concept of timing, which is critical to successful defensive shooting.

Most shooters only seem to be capable of shooting at one speed. Regardless of the target size or the distance, their firing cadence sounds exactly the same. This, of course, means that most of the time they are shooting at the wrong speed for the target presented. What they usually wind up doing is shooting slower than they have to at close range, but shooting too fast to get reliable hits at extended ranges.

 

The shooter’s mantra must be, “more target = less time; less target = more time.”

 

Obviously, the actual goal is to hit your target, whatever size it is, however far away it is, as quickly as possible. It’s not possible to hit a target too quickly, especially if it poses a threat to your life. On the other hand, one cannot miss fast enough to catch up! So, the goal is to always shoot as quickly as you can get a hit, but no faster.

The shooter’s mantra must be, “more target = less time; less target = more time.”

The bigger and closer the target is, the easier it is to hit, therefore, the faster we can shoot and get hits. On the other hand, when the target becomes smaller or more distant (the same problem, either way), we must slow down and refine our sight picture and trigger control, which takes more time.

To help internalize this timing requirement, I devised a simple drill we refer to as the 6/5/4 Drill. The shooter will fire six rounds, at five yards, in four seconds, hence the name. I make the targets on a copy machine, on 11 x 17-inch copy paper, so cost is minimal. The target contains the outline of an eight-inch circle, the outline of a standard business card, and the outline of a six-inch circle. This presents the shooter with three varying target sizes, requiring three different firing cadences, on one target.

On signal, the shooter will draw and fire two rounds at the eight-inch circle, two rounds at the business card, and two rounds at the six-inch circle. Par time is four seconds. The goal is all hits in four seconds or less. To make the time, the shooter will have to draw quickly and fire the rounds to the eight-inch circle quickly. He must then hit the brakes and slow down enough to hit the business card twice. The pace is picked back up for the hits on the six-inch circle. This reinforces the skill of choosing the right speed for the target size presented.

Of course, the drill can be modified to suit particular needs. You can start at the ready if unable to work from the holster on your range. If you have a five-shot revolver, fire only one round on the business card instead of two rounds. Having an electronic timer or a partner with a stop watch will help you work toward your four second par time goal. Use this drill to work on your timing and you’ll be a better all around shooter with your handgun.


CONTACT:

Rangemaster
www.rangemaster.com
(901) 370-5600

 

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