SIRT Training Pistol

The SIRT takes the dry fire pistol to a new level. I am a fan of dry fire training tools.
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The SIRT takes the dry fire pistol to a new level. I am a fan of dry fire training tools.

Keeping sharp with a pistol requires more repetitions than most of us can reasonably conduct with live fire. Whether it’s the time required to drive to a proper range, the cost of ammunition, or other factors, sufficient live fire practice is not always possible or practical.

Dry fire training is best when it’s realistic. While you can certainly engage in dry fire practice with your actual carry pistol (while following the proper safety precautions), this may not be the best option. (If you carry a Glock pistol dry fire realism is limited because the Glock trigger does not reset without cycling the slide.) Thus, practicing a string of multiple dry fire shots is not feasible.

 

SIRT is actually an acronym for “Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger.” The SIRT has a built in green laser that “fires” when the trigger breaks, to indicate the point of impact of a fired bullet.

 

The SIRT Training Pistol solves the trigger reset problem and offers a lot more functionality too. Currently the SIRT is only available in a Glock 17/22 size. The similarity is uncanny, and the training pistol feels very much like the real Glock pistol in size, weight and balance. The pistol even features a realistically weighted removable magazine. The SIRT will actually accept real Glock magazines and the SIRT dummy magazine can be used in a Glock. The SIRT training pistol, of course, has no ability to chamber a round of any kind, so using Glock magazines involves no safety concerns. The SIRT pistol and magazine also work with your existing holsters and gear for the ultimate in realistic practice.

Handling the SIRT feels just like handling my Glock 17 except the “slide” does not move. The sights are a good approximation of Glock sights, although they have a single white dot on the front sight and no dots on the rear. The trigger pull is a decent approximation of a Glock trigger, and has a noticeable reset allowing for repeated dry fire.

All of those features are very cool. But, the SIRT takes the dry fire pistol to a new level. SIRT is actually an acronym for “Shot Indicating Resetting Trigger.” The SIRT has a built in green laser that “fires” when the trigger breaks, to indicate the point of impact of a fired bullet. Interestingly, the laser’s point of impact (POI) is adjustable, so you can align the indicated POI for your eye with the aiming point of the fixed sights. Thus, the training pistol gives immediate visual feedback of the approximate point of impact of a bullet if a round had been fired. This gives the user the ability to evaluate the mechanics of their sight picture and trigger pull. Poor shooting mechanics are easily identified in this fashion.

However, the SIRT also has a secondary red laser. When this feature is turned on, the continuous red laser is activated whenever there is significant pressure on the trigger. This gives the shooter (or a trainer working with the shooter) immediate feedback on when the shooter has his finger on the trigger, and where the pistol was being aimed prior to firing. This is a unique feature to the SIRT that adds much more feedback to the dry fire experience.

The SIRT is very customizable. The sights can be replaced with aftermarket Glock sights to match your duty pistol. The point of impact of the lasers is adjustable. The trigger is adjustable in about any way a trigger can be adjusted, including six different ways to fine tune the trigger to exactly the desired specifications. The user can even switch the function of the red and green lasers if desired.

 

If I had to identify one drawback to the SIRT, it is the price. The unit retails for $394.95, which is comparable to the price of a used Glock pistol.

 

In short, this is a fantastic training tool. The SIRT is not a pistol and can be used just about anywhere in complete safety, yet the SIRT provides a very realistic simulation with the maximum feedback short of live fire practice. I now practice a large number of dry fire repetitions in and around my house several times per week. The SIRT is fun and easy, but is a real training tool.

If I had to identify one drawback to the SIRT, it is the price. The unit retails for $394.95, which is comparable to the price of a used Glock pistol. However, the SIRT is actually a lot more sophisticated piece of equipment than a Glock! The SIRT is very well constructed and features advanced laser and mechanical technology to create the most realistic training experience. Next Level Training also warrants their “made in the U.S.A.” pistol with this simple promise: “You break it, we fix it.” It is hard to argue with a policy that simple. Check out the SIRT Training Pistol at www.nextleveltraining.com. A SIRT will definitely take your dry fire practice to the next level, and likely your shooting performance as well.

Prices as of June, 2011.

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4 Comments (Add Yours)

  1. I have 2 of the SIRT Pistols and will probably be buying more. The SIRT is THE best training tool on the market it has so many uses that I couldn’t even scratch the surface here. My kids have used them for weeks before actually shooting a real handgun, then when they do it’s so easy for them, like they have been shooting for years. Training the average person, trouble shooting or the season veteran can learn alot from this SIRT.
    I have met, shot with and have become friends with Mike Hughes the owner of Next Level Training. He is PASSIONATE about shooting and training visit his web site, talk to him, take his classes you won’t regret it!!!

  2. Nice Review, we hope to help the concealed carry society by getting more concealed carry holders doing more gun handling!
    Personally I am getting a ton more appendix carry draws in verses the open top holster. Note I am biased of course… :) but wanted to chime in.
    cheers.

  3. After 3 months average use, the “green” laser stopped working. Trying to get customer service but they keep stonewalling/ignoring me. It’s been over a business week and they stopped responding to me 2 days in.

  4. I meant to re-address this sooner. The next week they got around to contacting me. Their e-mail service was down. Sent in for service, got it back and it works flawlessly.

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