Remora Holsters

The Remora has no clips , loops , or other attachment hardware. It just uses friction.

The Remora has no clips , loops , or other attachment hardware. It just uses friction.

A remora is the “suckerfish” you often see attached to sharks or other large marine animals. The defining characteristic is the way the remora firmly attaches to its host and won’t let go. Alan Bogdan, owner of Remora Concealment and Security Products LLC, was inspired by the remora fish’s legendary grip when naming his innovative new holster line.

The Remora is billed as a “no clip” and “non-slip” holster. In essence, the holster is a typical wrap-around holster design, but with no clips, loops, or other attachment hardware. The secret to the holster is the “sticky” rubber exterior that creates incredible friction with most any surface, including skin or clothing. The Remora functions as an inside-the-waistband holster simply by inserting the holster between your body and your pants and letting friction hold the rig in place.

The benefits of this “no clip” system are pretty obvious. First, the holster can be put anywhere along the waistband without regard to belt loops and such. It can also be placed in different orientations and adjusted to however most comfortable. Perhaps most importantly, the holster can be easily put on or taken off without the hassle of snaps or clips, or having to remove your belt. The potential down-side, of course, is also obvious. The holster is held only by friction, and vigorous activity or violent movement could dislodge the holster.

 

Remora holsters start at only $24.95, which is very reasonable for an American-made product.

 

In practice, the holster does stay put very well. It certainly holds in place better than similarly priced holsters with a single plastic or spring metal clip. I would personally prefer a solid belt attachment of some sort for everyday carry, but this holster works as advertised. I have used the Remora at times when my pistol had to be taken on and off several times in the course of the day. This ease of donning and doffing is the real strength of this particular design.

The smaller models can also serve as a pocket holster, and the tacky exterior helps retain the holster in the pocket on the draw. For small pocket-sized guns, you actually get two holster options from the same design.

Remora holsters start at only $24.95, which is very reasonable for an American-made product. You can add a variety of options, including a sweat guard or a “tuckable” option. You can even opt for a reinforced holster mouth if you are concerned about one-handed reholstering. At this price point, the Remora may be a great holster to experiment with both inside-the-waistband or pocket carry while searching for your ideal carry method.

Remora Concealment promises quick delivery times and guarantees your satisfaction. In fact, the holsters are backed by a lifetime guarantee. So even your modest investment in a Remora holster is a safe bet. You can purchase Remora holsters to fit most common firearms, and there is a fitment chart on the company’s website: www.remoraholsters.com. Even with all the holsters I own, I have found a use for the Remora—and I suspect you may, too.


CONTACT:

Remora Holsters
www.remoraholsters.com