High Noon Public Secret Holster

High Noon Public Secret Holster
| | 42 Comments

For concealed carriers in climates with four seasons that can bring significant temperature swings over the course of a year, the spring season is a special time. Just like the weather, personal wardrobes begin to change. Winter clothing gets packed away and summer clothing becomes the norm. For many, the seasonal change also brings a change in the kind of handgun that gets carried. That full-sized duty pistol which concealed so well under all that winter clothing now stays in the safe. A smaller gun, one that is much easier to conceal with lighter, cooler clothing, takes its place. A good everyday holster for the warmer weather includes the High Noon Public Secret. It looks bulky but is surprisingly well-suited to concealed carry, even when the weather calls for shorts and T-shirts. The Public Secret is thick but light in weight, simple but sturdy in construction, and goes on and off in a breeze.

Thick But Light Weight

Constructed of thick cowhide or horsehide with a slide guard that keeps the slide, hammer, and rear sights from touching the wearer, the Public Secret is molded to whatever gun you carry and also features a large and robust steel reverse J clip. While its construction makes it look bulky and heavy, the Public Secret is actually quite light in weight.

Despite the thickness of the leather wrapped around the Colt Defender that rode in it for hours at a time, the holster proved to be one of the more comfortable I have worn lately. I most appreciated the slide guard that kept the Defender’s sharp edges from poking into my side as well as the stitched in sight track that guided the gun into place when holstering it.

Simple But Sturdy

Despite its light weight, the Public Secret’s design and construction proved to be simple and sturdy and therefore very effective. The rough-side-out cowhide stabilized the rig very well and the slide guard not only protected my side but also provided more leather real estate to add even more stability.

The steel reverse J clip is one of the strongest I have ever seen in a handgun holster, ensuring that the holster will stay in place when drawing. When re-holstering, the reinforced holster opening does an excellent of job of maintaining the holster’s shape. In fact, the reinforcement contributes to the holster’s overall rigidity at a key location just over the belt line

While the Public Secret’s smooth leather interior does a fine job of holding a handgun in place under normal belt tension, a user can adjust the holster’s tightness via a built-in tension screw. I kept the tension screw at a level that was tighter than not as I often wore the Public Secret just clipped inside of the waistband with a pair of shorts and no belt.

Easy On, Easy Off

Civilian concealed carry can be a routine of putting a holstered gun on and off according to a variety of situations. As such, holsters that are easy on, easy off, have a distinct advantage over those that require more significant effort. This is even truer in warmer months. The Public Secret scored very well in this category, easily attaching inside of the waistband of whatever pants or shorts I was wearing and disappearing easily under just a single T-shirt.

The only difficulty, if it can even be called that, with putting the Public Secret on and taking it off was dealing with the very strong reverse J clip, which requires a firm grasp and pull in order to get it to open and slide past a belt or off the waistline of a pair of shorts. The strong clip, however, proves to be a key ally in keeping the holster securely in place, whether carrying or drawing.

In addition to being thick but light weight, simple but sturdy, and easy to put on and take off, the Public Secret offers a straight drop design (no cant) and provides combat grip accessibility. I mostly carried it at 3 or 4 o’clock—because the clip is so strong I could cant it forward a bit—and could easily get my hand and fingers around the stocks of the Defender while the gun was still fully seated in the holster.

As a made-to-order holster, the cowhide version of the Public Secret retails for $109.95 and the horsehide version retails for $159.95. With the weather changing, you might want to spring for one.

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42 Comments (Add Yours)

  1. Thaat looks dangerous with the hammer cocked while the gun is holstered.

    1. if y’all are concerned about the weapon being cocked and locked then y’all need to find a diffrent weapon or stick to revolvers. I’ve carried a 1911 for over 27 years and have not had a problem, but then again i know my weapons and how they operate. Semper Fi

    2. OldGunner
      You’re right about it being dangerous. I carry mine like that bcuz it makes ME MORE dangerous than the thug.
      The 1911 was designed to be carried in condition 1 and nothing will stop me from doing just that. The 1911 is all I carry so drawing and taking the safety off is my religion.
      You won’t have time or mental acuity to cock the hammer in a stressful situation, especially if you’re in a hand-to-hand confrontation.

    3. That is the ONLY way to cary a ‘single action’ pistol!!!

    4. Cocked and locked with one in the chamber is the recommended and taught way of carry for 1911′s. Unless the back strap is depressed when held firmly and safety released by thumb it will never fire. Hammer down with round in chamber is not recommended carry position.
      If one is uncomfortable with that method then the 1911 and 1911 style is probably not the gun for them.

    5. The Sig Sauer P238 has a safety switch that prevents the weapon from firing when cocked.

  2. It appears this rig has some good design features, but not such as ti justify such a “PRICEY’ COST STRUCTURE. tHANKS FOR THE PRESENTATION.

  3. Who do I contact to obtain the Public Secret?

    Thanks,

    1. Back2Basics

      I have 2 of their holsters and a gun belt. Top quality and excellent customer service.
      http://www.highnoonholsters.com/index.html

  4. In the picture of the high noon articale, the hammer is back / cocked. Is there a reason for that?

    1. It’s a 1911 style. Are you new to firearms in general?

    2. Simple, the 1911 is a single action only firearm. The firearm safety on it only works when cocked, and it is the best way to ensure both safety and readiness. The Military field manuals called for the weapon to be carried in this configuration whenever one may have to use it.

      Also, the safety has a very strong tension strength. It won’t just come off, and it’s still as strong a safety as any other pistol comes with.

    3. Look again at the comments above about this carry method. It is the prescribed method for the Colt (and clones) Model 1911. Designed by John Browning, this .45 caliber pistol was adopted by the US military and served well for over 70 years. I carried one in the Navy and had no problems. The 1911 has a thumb operated safety and a grip safety, added at the request of the Army at the time of its adoption. The weapon is a single action, meaning the trigger only serves to fire the gun. The operation of the slide ejects the spent cartridge case, picks up a new round from the magazine, cocks the hammer, and loads the new round into the chamber. The pistol is then ready to fire the next round, or you can put on the thumb safety and reholster your pistol. Some users carry the pistol with a round in the chamber and the hammer down. This requires cocking the hammer to fire the pistol. The absolute safest carry method is chamber empty, hammer down. It is very slow, comparatively, to pull back and release the slide after drawing the pistol, without a lot of practice. If you are not comfortable with the 1911, you might consider a double action or striker fired pistol. We 1911 users are trained and comfortable with it, and consider it the best combat pistol ever designed. (I know, Glock and other users, you feel the same way.) Chief Boring

    4. A single action pistol should always be carried “cocked and locked” or not carried. The picture is to show how the holster hides and protects the gun as carried. Those who can’t bring themselves to carry this way should stick to striker fire, dbl. action or sgl./dbl. action handguns.

  5. This ol’ Desert Rat has carried several different guns in an assortment of holsters. My primary carry gun today is a .40 cal. Taurus carried in a Crossbreed iwb which is by far the best ever and the price is right. If I need a holster outside the waistband I prefer a Fobus. If a smaller gun is needed I prefer a Galco holster for a S&W J frame. I have probably 50 assorted holsters used over many years. Some expensive, Others cheap and a few home made. None are better than the Crossbreed.

    1. Foxx holsters are just as good and far less costly

  6. Mark where would I go to check out this company and their products ?

    1. Back2Basics

      I have 2 of their holsters and a gun belt. Top quality and excellent customer service.
      http://www.highnoonholsters.com/index.html

  7. looks good, but will it fit a Glock model 22(40 cal.)

  8. The pistol is carried “cocked & locked.” Round in the chamber, hammer at full cock, safety on. The procedure is , I believe, taught in various LE academies. The weapon is drawn with pressure on the trigger, (1911′s & clones), and left thumb on the safety, ready to release it and fire the round when sights are brought to bear and decision to fire is made. The round is actually fired by the release of the safety. I don’t have a Public Secret, but they look sweet! Mine is carried in this condition (condition one), with a retaining strap over the hammer and between it and the firing pin

    1. “The weapon is drawn with pressure on the trigger, ”

      Not a good practice. The finger is not placed on the trigger until you are sure of your target and ready to fire. In drawing, the finger is laid straight along the slide, ready to put on the trigger when needed. Putting one’s finger on the trigger too early can result in unintended (NOT accidental) discharges, the sadness of hitting something that didn’t need shooting, and, worst of all, lawsuits and criminal charges if someone dies or is hurt. DO NOT PUT YOUR FINGER ON THE TRIGGER UNTIL READY TO SHOOT!. Chief Boring

    2. Condition one is very safe. Drawing your handgun with your finger on the trigger is NOT! It only takes one time where the safety is knocked off or you forgot to put it on and there goes your leg, foot, friend whatever. Keep your finger off the trigger until your sights are on the target and you are ready to shoot.

    3. Well said and should be #1 comment.

    4. I can’t believe I just read this comment. Based on the preceeding comments there are several who are not familiar with the 1911, but Fred W. Wilson’s comment is anything but a helpful to them. First let me say that the 1911 is arguably the best combat handgun in the world, but it is not a Handgun that should be carried without proper training and practice in it’s function and use, and it is definately not a beginners best choice for concealed carry. Yes, the 1911 is carried “cocked and locked” (or “Condition One”), and a properly maintained and working 1911 is perfectly safe when carried in this manner. However, this pistol (or any other for that matter) is NEVER “drawn with pressure on the trigger” and “fired by the release of the safety”. Sir, you need to run the other way from whoever taught you this. It is Wrong, Unsafe, and Downright Dangerous. The finger is never placed into the trigger gaurd or on the trigger until your muzzle is covering the target, you are sure of your target (and what is behind it), and you have made the concious decision to fire. … “Cooper’s Rule III: KEEP YOUR FINGER OFF THE TRIGGER UNTIL YOUR SIGHTS ARE ON THE TARGET” … You might want to do a bit more research, practice, and training with your 1911. As a starting resource I suggest Jeff Coopers ‘Modern Technique of the Pistol’ or ‘Cooper on Handguns’. Jeff Cooper is one of the 20th century’s foremost experts on the 1911 and its use.
      Stay Safe ….D.V.C.
      Diligentia – Vis – Celeritas

  9. This looks like something I could use. The price causes me to consider more choices before deciding.

  10. I have 2 public secrets. Great holsters, tension on the gun is adjustable to your preference with a screw on the side. Rubber located on the slide end has a cutout for the front sight which also helps secure the gun. Also have a “Bare Asset” and “Down Under” all with clips. After filling up a drawer with holsters I didn’t like I found these guys.

  11. For those asking about the website for purchasing one of these holsters: http://www.highnoonholsters.com/. I have two IWB holsters from High Noon for different pistols that I carry. I love these holsers. Although I perfer the Tuckable IWB versions such as Alter Ego and Closing Argument. I wore a Closing Argument for a full size 40 cal pistol on a summer day while helping a friend move. I wore T-shirt/shorts and no one was the wiser. I know cause I asked when we were done if anyone had noticed.

  12. No belt holster is worth what they are hoping to get for this one! An elaborate shoulder holster such as I built for myself is valued at the number they want for this little thing.

  13. if u own firearms and carry u must own many many holsters because one holster will not prevail .SO LETS START SELLING ALL OUR USED HOLSTERS ON LINE .

  14. I carry my Ruger LCR cocked and locked at all times! There is no external hammer but then there is no external safety as there is on the semi-auto in the picture. I just press the trigger and it goes BANG!!!

  15. without trying to be a hack for anyone, I have to recommend Holsterpro Gun Leather, @ holsterpro.com
    top quality, leather and craftsmanship. I own two holsters
    (IWB & OWB)from him and after being a Bianchi man for over twenty years he’s my holster maker now. Bianchi wasn’t producing anything for the Sig 238 and ran across Paul’s web site and could not be happier.

    1. please read the previous message as “I’d like to recommend” rather than “have to” … this is was my original
      thought, my keyboard wasn’t listening as I was typing

  16. it look very small ,but small for a glock 27, 40 cal.?AND THE $ ? for it.? must get if it work for me? santa comes ones a year for me ,family of 4 boys and 1 girl .i get toys to.

  17. The 1911 pictured is in its “ready to be used condition” and is not inherently “dangerous”. The thumb safety is on as carried not to mention the grip safety would also be engaged as depicted. The trigger is appropriately shielded from access by the holster as well. If a gun in this condition looks scary to you, you might want to spend a little more time educating yourself about firearms, their operation, and their proper concealed carry configurations.

  18. Looks great, but I’m left handed!

  19. I like the look and design of the ” High Noon Public Secret Holster”. Although, it does sound a bit pricey at $105.00.
    The gun I carry most often is my 1951 Colt 1911 Combat Commander (Cocked & Locked) as it was designed in a Milt Sparks IWB Summer Special II. Except for the retention (over the belt) clip, both holsters appear identical, that, and maybe the price. Milt Sparks design cost me approximately $80.00. For the money, I’ll stick with what I already own. If it ain’t broke…

  20. i had my glock 27, 40 cal.paint orgun duck colors yellow and green and the costco in my town told me to cover it .after so many time of me going to costco to spen $$$.they have nothing on doors about no guns ?so to spend $$$$ i coverd it?so i gessss i need to buy a new holster or they put info. about no guns at there storessssss. DOORSSSS………

  21. I CARRY A KIMBER CDP II, .45 COCKED AND LOCKED. THAT IS WITH A ROUND IN CHAMBER, HAMMER BACK, SAFETY ON. (CONDITION-ONE). WHEN DRAWN THE TRIGGER FINGER IS NOT ON THE TRIGGER. IT LAYS ALONG THE SLIDE ABOVE TRIGGER. THE WEAPON GOES INTO, OR THROUGH A HIGH READY POSITION WITH THE WEAK HAND JOINING THE STRONG HAND. WITH INTENT TO FIRE THE WEAPON IS EXTENDED WITH BOTH HANDS TOWARD THE TARGET. AS THEY ARE EXTENDED, THE SAFETY COMES OFF AND THE TRIGGER FINGER TOUCHES THE TRIGGER FOR THE FIRST TIME. IF THE SITUATION CHANGES THEN, AND I DECIDED NOT TO FIRE, THE WEAPON RETRACTS BACK INTO A HIGH READY POSITION AND AS IT COMES BACK THE TRIGGER FINGER COMES OFF OF THE TRIGGER AND THE SAFETY COMES BACK ON. THE TRIGGER FINGER GOES BACK ON THE SLIDE ABOVE THE TRIGGER. THIS CAN BECOME AN AUTOMATIC SAFETY PROCEDURE IF PRACTICED IN DRY FIRE. MANY POLICE OFFICERS CARRY COCKED AND LOCKED. IT STARTLED ME THE FIRST TIME IS SAW IT.

  22. The pistol is carried cocked because that is how it is designed to be carried. This is not a dual action or striker fires pistol. Do you hunt? Have you ever carried a bolt action, or semi auto rifle? How about a pump or semi auto shotgun? Any if these guns are cocked anytime a live round is chambered. We carry them cocked and locked and don’t think twice. Why don’t they scare us? Because we can’t see the hammer- It’s internal.

  23. I carry cocked and lock at first you should practice first dry fire get use to it.repeat it after all you should never take a gun and think just because you don’t cock it you better off your though should be cocked and ready to fire at moments notice,be mentaly alert cod yellow.

  24. I really like this style of holster…just not this particular holster. Got mine at A.E.Nelson Leather Co. They call theirs #92LP Summer Special and will make it to fit just about any pistol out there. I carry my Ruger P345 in the appendix position with it. A real nice plus is they put a narrow thick belt loop on it (instead of a wide clip), secured with a single, heavy-duty rivet. This allows the holster to swivel so you can reposition it for standing or sitting. Works great! The price is fantastic! And the wait was not long at all. If you’re considering this style of holster, you owe it to yourself to check it out.

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