The “Slap, Rack, and Roll” Drill

This drill is taken from the book Concealed Carry Fundamentals by Michael Martin, an excellent and very visual introduction to the basics of concealed carry.

To conduct the exercise, an assistant will load the shooter’s magazine with a mixture of live rounds and dummy rounds.

[Editor’s Note: This drill is taken from the book Concealed Carry Fundamentals by Author Michael Martin, an excellent and very visual introduction to the basics of concealed carry.]

 

Description

The “Slap, Rack, and Roll” drill is designed to give the shooter opportunities to clear malfunctions while engaged in the exercise and to determine if he is prone to flinching in anticipation of recoil. To conduct the exercise, an assistant will load the shooter’s magazine with a mixture of live rounds and dummy rounds. When ready, the shooter will fire a full magazine.

 

Goal

This exercise allows the shooter to build appropriate neural pathways (“muscle memory”) to quickly clear malfunctions. The shooter’s goal should be to safely clear the dummy round while maintaining his eyes and muzzle on the target.

 

 

To simulate the effects of auditory exclusion, run this drill with live stereo ear pieces inserted under your normal hearing protection

 

 

Distance

21 feet.

 

Things That a Coach Can Watch For

Watch for the shooter to maintain his muzzle downrange when clearing the dummy round (which will require him to turn his body slightly, not the muzzle of the gun) and watch to see if he maintains his eyes on the target. Also watch for any flinch when the shooter presses the trigger on the dummy round.

 

Alternatives

The assistant can actually load the magazine in the firearm, which would allow him to have the top round be a dummy round.

Place two or more dummy rounds in sequence.

To simulate the effects of adrenaline on the hands, run this drill after holding your hands in icy water.

To simulate the effects of auditory exclusion, run this drill with live stereo ear pieces inserted under your normal hearing protection. Turn up the volume loud enough so that the combination of music and hearing protection drowns out all other sounds. This will teach you to recognize your firearm’s proper operation and failures by feel alone—you’ll learn to trust that your firearm actually fired even though you didn’t hear the “bang” and you’ll learn to identify failures through a lack of recoil, rather than a lack of sound. During this version of the drill, the assistant will also be responsible for hearing any range commands and communicating them to the shooter.


CONTACT:

Minnesota Tactics
9001 Springwood Drive
Woodbury, MN 55125
(651) 210-1790
www.mntactics.com
Concealed Carry Fundamentals
www.keyhousepress.com