Dry-Fire Training Pistol

Dry-Fire Training Pistol

The bright red plastic frame of the Dry Fire Pistol makes clear this is not a pistol at all—but a dry fire training tool.

There is no question that dry fire training improves shooting skills. Over the years, I have reviewed a number of different dry fire training aids and systems. All have their strengths and weaknesses. This column features the Dry-Fire Pistol from the Dry-Fire Training Pistol Company.

The first thing you notice about this Dry-Fire Pistol (DFP) is that the DFP is not a pistol at all. This red plastic training gun is not likely to be confused with a real pistol, and will never accidentally shoot anyone. One real advantage of this product is the obvious safety factor. This training gun can be used in just about any environment with complete safety.

The DFP has the weight and balance of a real pistol. Cosmetically, the gun looks and feels like a 1911 style pistol, complete with beavertail grip. The sights are useable, and replicate typical fixed sights.

 

The Dry-Fire Training Pistol Company is very confident in its products, and has a money-back guarantee. The details are on the company’s website, but the gist of the policy is that you can return the pistol for a refund if your shooting does not improve.

 

Perhaps the most unique feature of the DFP is the ability to practice the transition in trigger pulls from double-action to single-action, as required in many modern semi-auto pistols. The DFP can be set so the first trigger pull simulates a long and heavy double-action pull, while the following trigger pulls simulate a shorter and lighter single action pull. I am not aware of any other training pistols that simulate this type of action, which is an important skill to master if you carry a traditional DA/SA pistol like a Sig Sauer P226 or a Beretta 92.

My only real criticism of the DFP is the odd combination of pistol characteristics. The pistol looks like a 1911 and has the trigger geometry of a 1911, but has a DA/SA trigger pull typical of a modern double-stack “wonder nine.” I would prefer to see the DFP in a form that more closely approximates the pistols that feature this type of trigger mechanism.

The Dry-Fire Training Pistol Company is very confident in its products, and has a money-back guarantee. The details are on the company’s website, but the gist of the policy is that you can return the pistol for a refund if your shooting does not improve. That is the kind of refund policy that gives you the confidence to buy and try without significant risk.

The DFP is very reasonably priced at only $56.50, plus shipping. The low cost of the DFP makes it an easy purchase that will make dry fire practice safe and easy anywhere you have the time to practice. You can find additional details and place an order at www.dry-fire.com.

All prices as of September, 2011.

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