Confirm Your Accuracy by Understanding Spatial Relationships

This is to understand spatial relations in terms of accuracy. A spatial relationship is how objects are related to each other in a given space.

SMOOTHLY press the trigger straight to the rear while you continue to focus on the front sight and strive to keep it aligned with the invisible line between your eye and the target.

A spatial relationship is how objects are related to each other in a given space. The front sight, rear sight, the trigger, your eye and the target are objects your mind has to relate to each other in a given space so that you can be consistently accurate. The male brain generally understands spatial relationships intuitively because it is set up that way, while the female brain learns this concept more effectively with a detailed verbal explanation. (Are there some women who understand it intuitively? Yes! Are there some men who need a detailed explanation? Yes!)

 

Look at the exact spot on the target that you want to hit and visualize a straight line between your eye and that spot.

 

We all strive for accuracy with our handguns. If you don’t hit what you intend to, you will, of course, hit something else, and you are responsible for it! When we don’t hit the spot on the target we want to, we call it a miss. But what happened? How do you fix it?

A “miss” happens when the front sight and the muzzle are pulled, pushed or jerked out of alignment with the straight line between your eye and the spot on the target you intend to hit because of the way you manipulate the trigger. The bullet will land wherever the muzzle and front sight are pointed when the gun goes off.

What happens when you miss:

  • You didn’t press the trigger smoothly to the rear, but instead pulled or pushed the front sight to the side or jerked it downward.
  • You might have jerked the trigger to just get the shot over with quickly.
  • You might have jerked the trigger because you knew the recoil was unpleasant.
  • You might have pushed or pulled the trigger because your finger isn’t in its proper place on the face of the trigger.
  • You might not have kept your eye watching the spot on the target. Here is a drill to try at the range with an unloaded gun. It is a dry fire drill. Please follow all safety rules!

How to fix it:

  • Look at the sights on the slide, or barrel, and note that the front sight and rear sight are always aligned with each other.
  • Look at the exact spot on the target that you want to hit and visualize a straight line between your eye and that spot.
  • Bring your handgun up to eye level so that the front and rear sight intersect that invisible line between your eye and the target.
  • Remember the top of the front sight must be level with the top of the rear sight.
  • Change your eye focus from the spot on the target to the front sight (your sharp focus will be on the front sight but you will still see the target).
  • SMOOTHLY press the trigger straight to the rear while you continue to focus on the front sight and strive to keep it aligned with the invisible line between your eye and the target.

If the front sight stayed on the spot you wanted to hit on the target, great! If it did not, try again and see if you can determine what it is that you are doing that causes the front sight to move out of alignment with that line between your eye and the target.

 

 

 

[ Longtime firearms instructor Vicki Farnam is the author of two books: Teaching Women to Shoot, A Law Enforcement Officer’s Guide, and Women Learning to Shoot, A Guide for Law Enforcement Officers. Both are coauthored with Diane Nicholl, and are available from DTI Publications, Inc. (www.dtipubs.com) or from Amazon. ]


CONTACT:

John and Vicki Farnam
Defense Training International, Inc.
Fort Collins, CO
(970) 482-2520
www.defense-training.com

 

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